Residents in Michigan who have had trauma to the brain more than likely suffer from some type of a brain injury. While these can vary from mild to severe, it can be scary for anyone dealing with the repercussions. Those with severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are more than likely not able to function at normal capacity, resulting in the inability to work and earn income. Help for these sufferers may come from social security disability benefits.

According to the Social Security Administration, traumatic brain injury can be categorized two ways. One is when an injury severely limits physical functioning and mental functioning in one of the following ways:

  • Trouble interacting with others
  • Issues with managing oneself
  • Difficulty remembering or understanding things
  • Hard time concentrating 

The other way TBI is determined is when motor function is messed up in two extremities, resulting in their difficulty of use such as inability to stand up or balance. These criteria must persist for a minimum of three months post injury in order to qualify for benefits.

The Brain Injury Association of America discusses how someone can apply for social security disability benefits. The first is to determine which program the applicant is qualified for. Social security disability (SSD) is available for those who have worked and contributed money into social security. Those who do not qualify for SSD, and are of low income, may be able to receive supplemental security income. Some applicants may be eligible for both programs. Applying can be done via the phone, online or in person at a social security office.